Archive for the ‘Poker History’ Category

Lynn "Queen of Hearts" ParisLynn “Queen of Hearts” Paris
There was a time when we thought it would be a good idea to keep our faithful fans up-to-date on which states would be next to vote to legalize and regulate online poker. We assumed it would happen on a fairly regular basis after the success of Nevada, New Jersey and Delaware. After all, is there really a state that wouldn’t benefit from the potential multi-millions of dollars in additional revenue?

Turned out that passing the legislation necessary to offer its citizens the right to enjoy online poker was a heckuvva lot more difficult for states to make happen than we imagined. It seems crazy, but nothing much has changed since 2013 (sorry, Pennsylvania, but you haven’t gone live yet!) except that more states have legalized marijuana than online gambling!

So, it’s our pleasure to announce that Virginia has become the fifth state ready to launch online gambling. Governor Ralph Northam signed SB 1126 today (March 26) after both houses of the legislature overwhelmingly supported it. However, don’t get too excited quite yet, poker players of Virginia. There are some very stringent rules for setting up casinos so you probably won’t be playing online until at least next year.

Unfortunately for those of you who were following Kentucky’s bid to join the online gambling states, their once promising H 175 has been shelved until 2020. Also on the cusp are West Virginia and Michigan, all hoping to become the sixth state to embrace online poker.

Until your state manages to pass the legislation needed for you to enjoy online poker, it looks like y’all will have to be satisfied playing in your home games, sitting at the poker tables! One thing is for sure; it is definitely a better way to meet people and find new poker buddies!

Any thoughts??

Pocket Bullets ParisJim “Pocket Bullets” Paris

Are you still crying over the last bad beat that took your stack? Maybe watching this video of the top five worst poker bad beats will make you feel a little bit better to know that you’re not alone. Bad beats happen to the best poker players around.

From Chris Moneymaker vs Jason Mercier; Mikel Habb vs Samantha Abernathy; Vannessa Selbst vs Dan Shak; Olivier Busquet vs. Sven Reichardt; and last, but by no means least, there’s the infamous time when Phil Hellmuth got three bad beats in one hand from Ernest Wiggins when, at Hellmuth’s request, they ran the turn and the river four times and Wiggins got unbelievably lucky and handed Hellmuth the bad beat with a full house of kings over nines.

So, at the end of the day, if you have suffered any bad beats, take heart and know that you are not alone in your misery.

Click here to send us your experiences with bad beats at the poker tables.

Lynn "Queen of Hearts" ParisLynn “Queen of Hearts” Paris

I have referred on many occasions to the vast sums of money that can be made playing poker. It never ceases to amaze me that a player can come in ninth in the WSOP Main Event and wind up winning $1 million. When can you ever place ninth in anything and walk away a millionaire? Or turn the $100 you walked in with into $5000 in one night?

But I never thought about how many losers there are in the game, especially among professional poker players. It seemed too obvious to mention – clearly for every big winner there have to be a ton of losers. But it’s not just about the percentages, or about losers on a particular night or in a particular high-stakes tournament. I’m thinking about serious, highly ranked poker players who have gone broke . . . and never came back from that.

In fact, according to a recent article by Alan Schoonmaker in Card Player Magazine , “If you’re a pro, you have a much higher probability of dying broke than members of other professions, including people who earn much less than you’re winning now.”

Yes, there are many pros that were extremely successful; former WPT and WSOP champions and bracelet winners like Johnny Moss, Stu Ungar, Dave ‘Devilfish’ Ulliot and Gavin Smith to name a few, that not only lost it all and spent their final years penniless, but they also died broke.

How could that happen? Why didn’t they always save a portion of their winnings for their old age? Why weren’t they at least eligible to receive social security and Medicare?

The answer, according to Schoonmaker, is too much self-confidence, otherwise known as arrogance. That’s when you ignore the rules, thinking you don’t have to save money or pay taxes like normal people, believing instead that there will ALWAYS be another huge pot to count on every time you take a seat at a poker table.

Sometimes, there isn’t.

Click here to leave me your thoughts on this?

Lynn "Queen of Hearts" ParisLynn “Queen of Hearts” Paris

I doubt that many of us worry much about opinions issued by the U.S. Department of Justice, especially since the DOJ issues literally hundreds of opinions, on hundreds of topics, on a weekly basis. They are not laws, after all.

But, last week, when the DOJ’s Office of Legal Counsel issued a new opinion concerning the 1961 Interstate Wire Act, the online poker industry was not only worried, but holding its collective breath. The opinion reversed the previous stance of 2011 which concluded that the Wire Act only applied to sports betting, opining this time around that the Wire Act applies to online poker as well.

Again, it’s not the law; it’s an opinion that will definitely be tested in the courts. But it’s an opinion that definitely threatens the growth of the online poker industry, hitting hardest those states currently trying to get bills introducing online poker passed in their states. It could also have a major negative impact on the future of interstate compacts like the highly profitable one that exists between New Jersey, Delaware and Nevada.

Senator Ray LesniakFormer New Jersey State Sen. Raymond Lesniak was a major player in the fight to get online poker in New Jersey and helped create the multistate online poker alliance that facilitates liquidity sharing. He’s ready to step back into the fray and do battle in the courts if necessary. As he told Online Poker Report:

“It looks like I will have to go to court again to straighten out the Justice Department’s overreaching on states’ rights, as I did with sports betting. This opinion is outrageous. It puts state lotteries at risk and state revenues. If Congress won’t fix it, I will through the judicial process.”

The burning question remains: can online poker in the U.S. survive this new Wire Act opinion? Or does it muddy the waters even more concerning which forms of online gaming are legal and which are not. It certainly will make those states that have yet to introduce gaming legislation proceed with caution, if at all.

Send me your thoughts or questions on this!!